Borlaug Institute for South Asia

  • On the field
  • BISA field visit
  • wheat-in-India
  • Mission: To catalyse an international scientific effort to improve food security in south Asia
  • Funding goal: $86 Million. Over the next decades, food security and economic development in South Asia and India will be increasingly and drastically affected by climate change
  • The average rural person in India spends 50% of their income on food. Maize, rice, and wheat prices are predicted to double in the next 20 years

The Borlaug Institute for South Asia (BISA) is a non-profit research institute dedicated to the improvement of food security and reduction of hunger in India. BISA is a collaborative effort between the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), The Indian Council for Agricultural Research (ICAR), and the Government of India. The objective of BISA is to harness the latest technology in agriculture to improve farming productivity and sustainably meet the demands of the future. BISA is more than an institute. It is a commitment to the people of India, a dedication to the farmers of India, and a concerted effort to catalyze a second Green Revolution.

‘The 50 PACT’ Conference

Dr. Thomas Lumpkin addressing the participants in the opening ceremony

"Farmers need to be more involved in developing and refining technology". This was one of the key conclusions of a technology working group comprised of leading Asian scientists, representatives of farmer groups and entrepreneurs who met during “The 50 Pact,” an international conference jointly organized by the Borlaug Institute for South Asia (BISA) and the Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) to celebrate 50 years of Dr. Norman Borlaug’s first visit to India.

Farmer profile

In Matiyala, a village in the Ghaziabad district, 35 km from Delhi, India, Sharanjit Singh Gill has been working with CIMMYT scientists to incorporate conservation agriculture practices on his farm. In addition to rice, Sharanjit Singh Gill also plants wheat, practices crop rotation with legumes (Sesbania), and raises livestock including cows and buffalo.